Season 2 Episode 5: Clara Brown

Clara Brown was born a slave in Virginia in 1800. At nine years of age, she and her mother were sent to Kentucky. By the age of eighteen she married and subsequently gave birth to four children. At 35 years of age, she was sold by her owner at auction and separated from her husband and children. Freed by her third owner in 1859, she came to Denver by working as a cook on a wagon train in exchange for her transportation. Brown is reportedly the first black woman to cross the plains during the Gold Rush.

Once in Colorado, she lived in Central City and established the first laundry. By 1866, she had accumulated $10,000 and began to actively search for her family; and, in the process helped newly freed slaves to relocate to Colorado. As “Aunt” Clara Brown’s profits in mines and real estate grew, she became more charitable, never turning away anyone in need.

With the death of two of her four children, and having lost track of her son, Brown returned to Kentucky in an attempt to locate her surviving daughter, Liza Jane. When Brown returned to Colorado, she brought with her sixteen freed women and men but she was unable to locate her lost daughter at this time. Sometime between 1866 and 1885, when Brown died, she was reunited with Liza Jane and a granddaughter, Cindy.

Clara Brown was honored by the Denver community and made a member of the Society of Colorado Pioneers. In her honor, a memorial chair was placed in Central City’s Opera House and a stained glass window can be found in the rotunda of the Colorado State Capitol.

From the Colorado Women's Hall of fame. Found at: http://www.cogreatwomen.org/project/clara-brown/

Season 2 Episode 4: Jim Goodheart

Jim Goodheart is a very interesting character from Denver history. Like so many others, he came to our city to re-invent himself. He struggled with his own demons, but over the course of his life helped too many others to be counted. His work at the Sunshine Mission (a predecessor to the Denver Rescue Mission), changed our city for the better. He was a Denver peacemaker through and through.

If you're interested in Daniel Reichel's paper about Jim Goodheart, the Denver Public Library's link to the paper is here.

The article below came from American Magazine, Volume 83. It was digitized by Google.

 

Season 2 Episode 3: Silas Soule

Silas Stillman Soule (July 26, 1838 – April 23, 1865) was an American abolitionist, Kansas Territory Jayhawker, anti-slavery militant, and a friend of John Brown and Walt Whitman. Later, during the American Civil War, he joined the Colorado volunteers, rising to the rank of Captain in the Union Army.

Silas Soule was in command of Company D, 1st Colorado Cavalry, which was present at Sand Creek on November 29, 1864, when he refused an order to join the Sand Creek massacre. During the subsequent inquiry, Soule testified against the massacre's notorious ringleader, John Chivington, and soon after, he was murdered in Denver, presumably in revenge for this act.

Season 2: Episode 2 Chief Left Hand (Niwot)

 

Chief Niwot or Left Hand(-ed) (c. 1825–1864) was a tribal leader of the Southern Arapaho people and played an important part in the history of Colorado. Chief Niwot and his people lived along the Front Range often wintering in Boulder Valley, site of the future Boulder, Colorado. Despite breaching the borders of Arapaho territory — defined by the Fort Laramie Treaty as the area between the North Platte River and the Arkansas River — early prospectors were welcomed by Niwot in Boulder Valley during the Colorado Gold Rush.

(Top) Chief Left Hand (Image found at: http://www.franksrealm.com/Indians/tribes/Arapaho/pages/arapaho-lefthand.htm)

(Bottom) Arapaho camp across Cherry Creek from the gold seekers camp in 1858. (Image found at: http://coloradoencyclopedia.org/article/chief-left-hand-niwot)

Season 2: Episode 1 Ned Wynkoop

If you've ever been to downtown Denver, you might have run across Wynkoop Street or even had a beer at the Wynkoop brewery. In this episode of the Delve Denver Podcast, Jeff Johnsen explores the person behind the name.

Edward "Ned" Wynkoop is an interesting figure in Denver's history and his story and life makes him a Denver peacemaker.

Camp Weld Council, September 28th, 1864. Standing L-R: Unidentified, Dexter Colley (son of Agent Samuel Colley), John S. Smith, Heap of Buffalo, Bosse, Sheriff Amos Steck, Unidentified soldier. Seated L-R: White Antelope, Neva, Black Kettle, Bull Bear, Na-ta-Nee (Knock Knee). Kneeling L-R: Major Edward W. Wynkoop, Captain Silas Soule.

Season 2, Episode 1 – An Introduction to Peacemaking

In Delve Denver Podcast's second season we will be exploring the idea of peacemaking in Denver through the lens of some historical figures who, despite their own flaws and shortcomings, embodied the role of peacemaker in the city. In this episode, Jeff introduces his thoughts on peacemaking and what makes a peacemaker as context for the profiles that will be coming. 

Thanks for listening!

Ep. 11 Our Season 1 Wrap Up

This first season of the Delve Denver Podcast has been a lot of fun. We're working on the content for Season 2. Stay tuned for new episodes.

In today's episode, we look back on the last few months of recording conversations and seeking to uncover the soul of Denver by looking at its people, places, history and ideas. We hope you've enjoyed listening. 

In our conversation today, Jeff talks about some of his favorite podcasts. Here are the links to those:

Remembering Tomorrow with Robert Gelinas

Faith Circus with Kathy Escobar and Karl Wheeler

Changing Denver with Paul Karyoli

City as Playground with Dave Hillis of Leadership Foundations

On Being with Krista Tippet

Episode 10 Camp Weld: Marking (and hiding from) Denver’s Past

There is an historical marker in a funky little corner of the city that marks an old military base from Denver’s earliest days. The marker is difficult to find, almost as though we both wish to remember what happened here…and wish we could forget it. In this episode of the podcast, host Jeff Johnsen takes us to Camp Weld.

Historical Marker at Camp Weld

Special thanks to the website Across the Creek for the images. Read more about the history of Camp Weld at: Link